Dementia and Denture

Dementia, one of the main causes of disability later in life, is a progressive, neurodegenerative disease that affects the capacity to conduct daily living activities. It results in a decline in multiple areas of function, including memory, communication and reasoning skills and includes psychological symptoms such as depression, psychosis and aggression. Dementia is a malady of movement and is arranged in three distinct stages, those being early, center (moderate) and later (serious) phases of dementia. When designing a plan of care for a patient with dementia, it is important to understand the stage of the disease. Patients with dementia can lose teeth though it is not clear if the risk, rate of tooth loss or prevalence varies for those with dementia compared to those without.

A denture is a detachable replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissues. Two types of dentures are accessible finished and halfway dentures. Complete dentures are utilized when every one of the teeth are missing, while incomplete dentures are utilized when some regular teeth remain.